EATING OUT

A whole new flavor to restaurants

Table Service

Your favorite restaurant may not look the same when it reopens. Many will need to reduce the number of tables that are available, space them out more, install partitions or seat people at every other table. These measures help create distance between diners.

Menu Please

No more plastic or reusable menus. Because the coronavirus
can live on some surfaces for days, disposable paper menus will
likely be needed for each customer.

Reservations Only

If your favorite restaurant is popular, you probably won’t be able to grab a seat whenever you want. Reservations may be required to keep people from crowding doorways or bars. Since there will be fewer tables, you’ll have to plan ahead.

Masked Service

Expect everyone working at the restaurant to be wearing a mask and possibly gloves. Workers in the kitchen will need to be spaced out by 6 feet. Staff will also need to be trained on the proper way to wear their masks and remove them.

Pass the Salt

You probably won’t see condiments on your table anytime soon. That’s because health officials want to reduce the number of items that multiple people can come into contact with. You’ll probably have to ask for salt or pepper, and don’t be surprised if it comes in disposable, single-use packages.

Screened Servers

Employers will need to screen employees for illness, making sure they don’t have a fever, or other symptoms of COVID-19. Employees who are not feeling well must stay at home.

Think Small

Don’t plan on any large gatherings; the number of people allowed at each table will likely be limited to protect staff and other guests. Establishments that provide outdoor seating may be able to accommodate somewhat larger groups.

Get Used to Takeout

Even when dine-in service is allowed, not all restaurants will start table service immediately. Many restaurants need to turn over their tables a number of times to make ends meet, so opening up for table service may not make financial sense. Plus, they may not be able to afford to bring back all employees when they reopen.